2014 Engineering Photo Competition

Carl Zeiss is primarily known for optics. In 2014 the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge held a photo competition open to staff and students sponsored by Carl Zeiss. Here are my favorites among the winners:

“Gemstone” by Adrianus Indrat Aria/Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge
“Gemstone” by Adrianus Indrat Aria/Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge

Because of its unique properties, e.g. electrically conductive, highly porous, and lightweight, graphene foam has the potential to be used in numerous advanced applications including chemical sensing, energy storage, and ultra-lightweight structures.  The abstract of “Gemstone” is made from graphene foam.

“Graphene”  Flowers II by Mari ljas/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge
“Graphene” Flowers II by Mari ljas/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge

Graphene is also an attractive material for applications exploiting interaction with light, such as optoelectronics. In multilayer graphene rotating some of the layers leads to a modification of both electronic and optical properties. These beautiful flowers came out of a simulation of the electron-light interaction matrix elements, illustrating the intensity of light absorption for different electronic band pairs.

“A constrasting landscape” by Calum Williams, Yunuen Montelongo & Jaime Tenorio-Pearl/Department of Engineeering/University of Cambridge
“A constrasting landscape” by Calum Williams, Yunuen Montelongo & Jaime Tenorio-Pearl/Department of Engineeering/University of Cambridge

Viewing metallic nanospheres under a scanning tunneling microscope results in the strange landscape shown above.

“Francis the Engineer” by Anthony Rubinstein-Baylis/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge.
“Francis the Engineer” by Anthony Rubinstein-Baylis/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge.

In rural Malawi people crowd around a broken pump and the man who has come to fix it – Francis the Engineer. Although he has no official training, single handedly he has brought water to scores of local villages through his ingenuity and hard graft. He has perfected his own design of “elephant pump” using mud, rope, plastic bottles and bike tires. As soon as he arrives on the scene the crowd parts, he scratches his head, takes off his trousers and hops into the well. The children peer down into the dark chasm and Francis gives a wink as the all clear is sounded.

“Terminal villi and the fetal capillary bed in the human placenta” by Romina Plitman/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge
“Terminal villi and the fetal capillary bed in the human placenta” by Romina Plitman/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge

Terminal villi allow the diffusion of oxygen and the exchange of nutrients from the maternal blood to the fetal blood. Their efficiency is directly related to their spatial arrangement and geometrical features. Recent developments in imaging technology have allowed researchers to visualize the fetal capillary arrangement (green) inside the placental terminal villi (red).

“Dancing in the Wind/Combustion & Flame VI” by Girish Venkata Nivarti/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge
“Dancing in the Wind/Combustion & Flame VI” by Girish Venkata Nivarti/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge

Simulation of gas density evolving over several microseconds in a region of intense turbulent fluctuations typically observed in jet engines and gas turbines.

“Stretch and swirl I” by Dhiren Mistry/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge
“Stretch and swirl I” by Dhiren Mistry/Department of Engineering/University of Cambridge

Swirling dye pattern generated by the roll-up of fluid exiting a round nozzle of a jet. The flow is illuminated using a green laser filtered out using an optical filter positioned in front of the camera.

 

 

 

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