Home is Where the Microbes Are

A person’s home is their castle and they populate it with their own subjects – millions and millions of bacteria.

When we move from one location to another we take all of our bacteria with us and “colonize” the space around us within a matter of hours. These “bacterial signatures” are unique.

Mouth microbes Credit Martin Oeggerli, with support from School of Life Sciences, FHNW

Microbiome studies could serve as a forensic tool. In the future scientists could look at bacterial colonies to identify the last person to come into contact with the victim of a crime and estimated when the contact happened.

Microbes on small intestines Credit: Stephanie Schuller

The human gut teems with bacteria, many of their species still unknown. They help us digest food and absorb nutrients, and they play a part in protecting our intestinal walls. Gut bacteria may also help regulate weight and ward off autoimmune diseases.

Chain of streptococcus in a lab sample. Credit: Photo by Martin Oeggerli, with support from School of Life Sciences, FHNW
Colored scanning electron micrograph of microbes in human gut Photo by Martin Oeggerli

What are “superbugs” ? Any bacteria that cannot be treated by two or more antibiotics is being called a superbug. The CDC claims the single leading factor for the increase in superbugs is the misuse of antibiotics. Most people who get a C. diff (Clostridium difficile) infection are getting medical care.

SEM by David Phillips of Clostridium Difficile

MRSA (Staphylococcus aureus) is carried by around 30 per cent of the population without causing any symptoms. However, in vulnerable people, such as those that have recently had surgery, it can cause wound infections, pneumonia and blood poisoning. MRSA cannot be treated with penicillin.

Staphylococcus aureus MRSA bacteria, computer artwork by Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library

Doctors sometimes recommend beneficial bacteria, also known as probiotics, for patients suffering from GI illnesses such as colitis and Crohn’s disease. However, these over-the-counter probiotic supplements may contain varying amounts of bacteria, and may include cells that are no longer viable. Furthermore, these probiotics have no protective coating, so they can be damaged by acid in the stomach before reaching the intestines.

An MIT team has come up with a method of coating these beneficial bacteria with layer-by-layer layers of polysaccharides or sugars. The thin, gel-like coating protects the bacteria cells from acid in the stomach, as well as bile salts. Once the cells reach the intestines, they settle in and begin replicating, creating a whole new microbiome.

MIT coated probiotic bacteria Credit: Second Bay Studios

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s